Teresa Clyne

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What is Geographical Profiling?

The geographic model can potentially be applied to all sorts of crime. It examines the distribution of a series of crimes, as was the case in Stuart Kind’s prediction of the Yorkshire Ripper’s base of action and David Canter’s
work in establishing the significance of location in the Railway Murderer (John Duffy) case. Geographic profiling, however, began in North America.

The North American approach Geographic profiling is an investigative tool developed by Kim Rossmo. He developed it whilst he was serving as a Detective Chief Inspector in the Vancouver City Police Department. Now Dr. Kim Rossmo, he has been a research professor in Texas State’s Department of Criminal Justice since
2003, and the University’s Endowed Chair in Criminology since 2007.

Although there have been a number of studies of offenders’ spatial patterns, it is Rossmo who is most widely connected with geographical profiling as an
investigative tool. He advocated its use in conjunction with, and as a complement to, crime linkage and investigative profiling.

In his address to the National Center for Intelligence Studies, Rossmo (1998) defined geographic profiling as:

‘An information management strategy to assist in serial, violent crime investigations, which facilitates the focus of investigative efforts. It is also a support service, a type of analysis and an investigative procedure. The whole
process is based on the intelligent collection, analysis and sharing of information. Suitable crimes for geographical profiling are those that are serial in nature, murder, rape, robbery, arson, bombings and predatory crimes such as sex murders or child molestation.’

Can a person be addicted to crime?

In a word, .... YES.

Crime addictions, like any addiction the addiction to crime has common characteristics (Peale. S, 1985) "addictive experiences are potent modifiers of mood and sensation".

There is a common theory that the following characteristics of addictions include:

...Tolerance - the need for more to produce the same effect.
...Withdrawal - distress after a period of non-engagement.
...Craving - distress associated with desire to re-engage.
...Salience - increasing importance of addiction in lifestyle.
...Conflict - increasing awareness of negative consequences.
...Relapse - reinstatement after a decision to stop or reduce.

Addicted to sexual crime

There are four main studies in the sexual offending literature which suggest that some sexual offending can be addictive. The first is that of McCulloch et al (1983) where the authors took a sample of sadistic sexual offenders in a British Special Hospital.

They found that of their sample of 16, 13 described elaborate and frequent masturbation fantasies. These fantasies showed tolerance in that for many subjects, they were being constantly revised in the direction of greater sadistic and violent content.

Some offenders reported that, after a time, their fantasies had become unsatisfying and had to be supplemented with their acting-out part of the fantasy for them to continue to achieve that state of arousal they were seeking.

For many, these “behavioural try-outs”
eventually led to the full index offence or offences for which they were convicted.

Private Investigation Course

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Law and Ethics Cram Notes

Have you ever just wanted notes on law which define the main topics and module contents and lots of MCQs but just did not have the time to write them yourself?

Then look no further.

My Business Law Cram and Revision Notes with over 250 Multiple Choice Questions (MCQs) AND Answers is the answer.

Welcome to my ATI / ACCA / CPA business law notes booklet, before I go on, I will just explain that not every topic in the ATI / ACCA / CPA exams is covered in this book but probably 70% of the major areas are, (this is a revision and cram booklet, not a textbook). I teach ATI & CPA law and ethics and business management and have found that putting notes together for my students has proved invaluable and also helps me to ensure that no areas are left unstudied.

The primary aim of this business law revision booklet is to prepare you for the exams ahead, these law notes have all of the relevant topics you need to pass your ATI / ACCA / CPA exam, of course you must have the information in the first place so ensure you have bought a good law manual, (my business law book, which covers ALL of the ATI / ACCA / CPA modules and LO’s, An Introduction to Business Law is available on Amazon)

law cram notes

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An Introduction to Criminology

Criminology for Beginners has been written for aspiring criminologists or those wish to study criminology purely for personal interest. It has been written in easy to follow terms and will enable the student to understand the basics behind criminological theories, from the definition of crime to deviant and anti-social behaviour, from the Salem witch trials to medieval ordeals, the history of criminology, classical, neoclassical to modern day theories of crimes.
It goes on the discuss Crime and Punishment and the Legal Systems in Both the UK and Ireland, finally discussing the Police, Courts and Judicial systems who deal with the perpetrators of crime

Introduction
Criminological Theories
Criminology Defined
Crime
Criminology
Antisocial, deviant and immoral conduct
The History of Criminology
The Salem Witch Trials
Medieval Trials
The Enlightenment age
The Classical School
Jeremy Bentham
Neoclassical
The Positivist theory
Franz Joseph Gall (1758–1828)
Charles Darwin (1809–1882)
Modern Theories of Crime
Anomie or Strain Theory
Social Learning Theory
Social Control Theory
Labelling Theory
Radical Theory
Deterrence Theory
An Economic Model of Crime
Deterrence and Econometrics
Environmentalism
Rational Choice
Ethnicity and Crime
Feminist Theory
Age and Crime
Age/Crime Curve
Distribution of Crime.” American Journal of Sociology
Mental Disorder and Crime
The Original position
The veil of ignorance
The Veil of Ignorance.
Rawls Reasonable Citizens
Rawls principle of Justice
The Chicago School and the US theories
Robert Park and Ernest Burgess
Right Realism
Left idealists
White Collar Crime
Insider Dealing
Money laundering
Theories of Violent Crime
Murder
Gang Crime
Modern gangs
Theories of Criminal Behaviour.
Psychoanalytic theorists and the origins of crime
Psychoanalysis
Sexual Offenders
Rape
Biological Theories of crime
Genetic – Twin Studies
Genetic – Adoption Studies
Intelligence and Learning in Criminology
Goddard’s work was discredited
Crime addictions
Tolerance
Withdrawal
Craving
Salience
Euphoria / relief / mood regulation
Conflict
Relapse
Recognising criminal addictions
A Theoretical Model of Behaviour Addictions for Addictive Offenders 88
Media and Crime
The Media Representation of Crime
Labelling Theory:
Deviancy Theory
Strain Theory
The Irish Legal System
Brehon Law
Source one – The Irish Constitution
Source two – European Community Law
The European Community Treaties
Regulations
Directives.
Decisions.
Recommendations.
Opinions.
Source three – Common Law
Source four – Acts of the Oireachtas or Legislation
Delegated/secondary legislation
The English Legal System
The Rule of Law
The Different Departments in the Police Service
Criminal Investigations Department (CID)
Dog handlers
Mounted Police
River police
The Prison service HMS Prisons
History of the Prison Service
Probation
Role and Function of the Probation Service
Magistrates’ and County Courts
The Crown Court
High Court
Supreme Court.
Penology in the UK
Penology in Ireland
Location of Prisons and Places of Detention
The Garda Siochána
The Civic Guards
Criminal division of the Gardaí
Modern Gardaí
Criminal Assets Bureau (CAB)
Special Detective Unit
Civil Liability & Courts Act 2004Criminology July 2017.png

The Handy Booklet of Irish Law: An Introduction to the law of Tort for Beginners

The Law of Tort
Torts are concerned with civil wrongs, whereby one party causes damage to another party.
• Tort is the French word for a “wrong” or Latin for “twisted”.
• Tort is a branch of Civil Law; therefore a tort in law is called a “Civil Wrong”
• Tort law protects a variety of injuries and provides remedies (ways to fix) them.
Torts can be distinguished from legal wrongs:
A Tort is not a breach of contract, where the obligation which is alleged to have been breached arose under an agreement between two parties.
A Tort is not a crime, where the object of proceedings is to punish the offender rather than compensate the victim.
Using tort law, an injured party can bring a civil case to seek compensation for a wrong done to the party (plaintiff, or injured party) or the party’s property.
Tort damages or compensation are monetary damages that are sought from the offending party.
They are intended to compensate the injured party for the injury suffered.
The Law of Tort
Types of Tort
Intentional Torts
Trespass to the person
Threats
Silent phone calls
Trespass torts in medicine
Defences to the tort of trespass
Consent
Self-defence
Defence of Third Persons
Lawful Authority
Defence of Property
Duress (pressure or threat)
Trespass to Land
Trespass to Goods
Conversion
Sample conversion
Chose in Action (Intangible Property – Transferable by assignment)
Trespass to Goods – Detinue
Nuisance
Private Nuisance
Locus Standi
Omissions
Damage or Interference
Material Damage
Interference with enjoyment
Magnitude of harm
Nature of locality
Defendant’s motives
Social utility
Defences to Private Nuisance
Remedies
Injunctions
Public Nuisance:
Pure Economic Loss
Remedies
Damages
Injunctions
Private Rented Tenants:
Local Authority Tenants:
Private Homeowner:
Alarms
Passing Off
Elements of Passing off
Defamation
Defences to Defamation.
Defamation Cases in Ireland
Blasphemy
Defamation Act 2010
Defences
Damages
Unintentional Torts
Negligence
Duty of Care
Irish development in duty of care
Foreseeability and Policy Factors
Contributory Negligence
The Standard of Care
Breach (of the duty of care)
Causation
Causes-in-fact
The “but for” Test
Novus Actus Interveniens
Material Contribution test
Bolitho Test
Fairchild
Remoteness
“Cause in law”
The “thin skull” rule.
Professional Negligence
Defences in Negligence
Voluntary assumption of risk (defence of consent)
Illegality
Contributory Negligence
Damages
Strict Liability Torts
The Occupiers Liability Act 1995
Vicarious Liability
Employers Liability
Liability for Defective Products
Liability for Defective Products Act 1991 (No. 28 of 1991)
Rylands V Fletcher:
Statute of limitations
The lighter side of the law
Law of Tort – Multiple Choice Questions
Law of Tort – Multiple Choice Questions – Solutions
Glossary of Termspocketbook of irish lawlaw of tortnuisanceduty of care

Authored by Teresa M Clyne MSc

List Price: €7.99

8″ x 10″ 

146 pages

ISBN-13: 978-1548593148 (CreateSpace-Assigned)
ISBN-10: 1548593141

https://www.irishtimes.com/news/crime-and-law/new-laws-proposed-to-support-domestic-violence-victims-1.2295963

New laws proposed to support domestic violence victims

Bill would be a ‘game-changer’ for victims, says national organisation

Proposed new legislation should make it easier for victims of domestic violence to get barring orders against perpetrators and ban electronic communications if required.

Minister for Justice Frances Fitzgerald said on Friday the Domestic Violence Bill, which has been approved by Government, would reduce the risk of intimidation to the victim or a witness through the courts process.

The reforms would also allow victims to give evidence through video, protect their anonymity and restrict the people attending the courtroom.

“Domestic violence persists as true horror in too many homes in 21st Century Ireland, ” Ms Fitzgerald said.

“In addition, too many incidents of domestic violence still go unreported. Too many victims are afraid to come forward,” she said.

Ms Fitzgerald said she wanted to tackle domestic violence and let victims know they were not alone.

The proposed law would also make it easier for a victim to get the perpetrator removed from their home.

“The Bill will remove the requirement that a person must have at least an equal interest in a property to apply for an interim barring order (for 8 working days) in an emergency or crisis situation,” Ms Fitzgerald said.

The proposed legislation also includes banning the perpetrator from communicating electronically communications, including through online or phone, with their victim.

The Minister said the Bill was created to improve protections available to the victims.

“It is in the interests of victims that we get this legislation drafted and enacted as soon as possible.”

Ms Fitzgerald said the Bill would bring provisions on domestic violence in one piece of legislation to make it easier to use.

She said it was a “major step” towards Ireland’s ratification of the Council of Europe Convention on Preventing and Combating Violence Against Women and Domestic Violence, known as the Istanbul Convention.

She said she would seek the Government’s approval for Ireland to sign the convention in autumn.

A recent EU-wide study on violence against women showed that 12 per cent of Irish women and girls over the age of 15 had experienced stalking, with 50 per cent of that group being stalked, physically and online, by a partner or ex.

Figures from the Women’s Aid Female Homicide Watch showed more than half of 18-25 year old women killed in Ireland since 1996 were murdered by their current or former boyfriend.

Safe Ireland chief executive Sharon O’Halloran, a national organisation for domestic violence, said the proposed legislation would be a “game-changer” in creating a system that would give victims the confidence to know they would be believed and protected.

She said the Bill was well thought-out and a “highly-sensitive piece” of legislation.

“Domestic violence is an enormous problem in Ireland and a problem that is still largely silent. We know that eight out of every ten women who experience abuse never report it,” she said.

“It will strengthen a number of vital provisions to protect victims and will make our courts system more accessible for, and more sensitive to, the very specific needs of women in danger and at risk of intimidation.”

Ms O’Halloran said it was important adequate resources would be given to meet the aspirations within the Bill.

Fianna Fáil spokesman Niall Collins said while welcomed the draft bill and it was a “step forward”.

“I do hope this legislation will assist victims but the Government’s record on this matter is unimpressive,” he said.

“The (Istanbul) Convention was signed in May 2011. We have been calling for full enactment of its proposals in the Dáil for the past three years.”

The full details of the general scheme of the Bill can be viewed here.

The Pocket Book of Irish Law: The Irish Legal system for Beginners

CLICK HERE TO BUY THE POCKETBOOK OF IRISH LAW

The Pocket-sized Book of Irish Law – A guide to the Irish Legal System with a user friendly index. The compact format of this pocket-sized booklet makes it ideal for the reader to access information which they can carry around in their purse or coat which makes it convenient and suitable for daily life.

Law and the legal system are at the heart of all aspects of life in Ireland, from buying a cup of coffee on the way to work to investing in your first (or any home), getting a job to opening a new business, law surrounds our every move, yet most people living in Ireland are unaware of its impact on their daily lives.

The first time most people encounter the law is either, in a small civil matter, like contract issues, or minor road traffic offences, such as parking illegally or speeding etc.This basic introductory PocketBook is just that, a layman’s guide, it is not meant to be an academic text book, it is merely a guide, however, saying that, many first year law students on the CPA, ATI and ACCA courses as well as year one legal proactive and LLB students find it invaluable as it introduces all the rules and principles in plain English and they can then get on with the important task of learning the terminology once they come to grasps with the principles.

There is a self-test MCQ at the end of the book AND answers.

So what’s inside

What is a legal system
What is a crime
The distinction between criminal and civil cases
The burden and standard of proof
Classification of Laws
Substantive Law
Procedural Law
Civil Law
Criminal law
Natural Law
Canon law
The Rule of Law
Common law compared to Civil law
Common Law
Civil Law
Pre Common Law in Ireland
Brehon Law
Sources of law in Ireland
European Community Law
The Doctrine of Supremacy
The European Community Treaties
Regulations
Directives
The EC institutions
The Organs of the EC
The Irish Constitution
Fundamental personal rights guaranteed under the Irish constitution
Common Law
Acts of the Oireachtas or Legislation
Primary Legislation
Delegated Secondary legislation
Associated Statutory Instruments
The Rule of Law
The Separation of Powers
The Attorney General
The Organs of State
The President
The Executive
The Legislative
The Judiciary
Judicial Independence
The legislative process in Ireland
Statutory Interpretation
Aids to Interpretation
Intrinsic aids
Extrinsic aids
Interpretation Acts
The Law of Equity
Equitable Remedies
An Introduction to the Irish Court System
The District Court in Ireland
The Small Claims Court
The Circuit Court in Ireland
The High Court in Ireland
Structure of the High Court of Ireland
The Court of Appeal in Ireland
The Supreme Court in Ireland
The lighter side of the law
Multiple Choice Questions
**Warning; another disclaimer ** This booklet has at its core, terminology which is aimed at a novice, it has some terminology explained in plain English in brackets (like this) and explanations of core rules and principles (at the end of paragraphs), it has icons and also humorous pictures (to remove the staunchness of legal reading), and at the end it has some court humour excerpts and the lighter side of law, a look at some old, strange and by modern standards, weird laws, if you don’t want to see these when you are reading your legal book, probably best for you “mosey on by” & not buy/read this one.
1

common law - teresa clyne

The Irish Legal System

brehon law teresa clyne

The Irish Legal System

pocket-watch-598039

Law Quiz

CLICK HERE TO TAKE THE QUIZ

legal system jpg

click here to take the quiz

The Handy Booklet of Irish Law – The Irish Legal System

common law - teresa clyne

This Introduction to Irish law bookletClick Here to BUYThe Irish Legal System

brehon law teresa clyne

The Irish Legal System

legal system jpg

The Irish Legal System

An Introduction to the Irish Legal System for beginners

This Introduction to Irish law booklet is a handy little number, it is compiled so that the most difficult and challenging terminology, rules and principles are explained, leaving you to enjoy learning about the law in Ireland without the headache of first learning terminology and confounding principles.

Law and the legal system are at the heart of all aspects of life in Ireland, from buying a cup of coffee on the way to work to investing in your first (or any home), getting a job to opening a new business, law surrounds our every move, yet most people living in Ireland are unaware of its impact on their daily lives.

The first time most people encounter the law is either, in a small civil matter, like contract issues, or minor road traffic offences, such as parking illegally or speeding etc.

This basic introductory booklet is just that, a layman’s guide, it is not meant to be an academic text book, it is merely a guide, however, saying that, many first year law students on the CPA, ATI and ACCA courses as well as year one legal proactive and LLB students find it invaluable as it introduces all the rules and principles in plain English and they can then get on with the important task of learning the terminology once they come to grasps with the principles.

There is a self-test MCQ at the end of the book AND answers.

**Warning; another disclaimer ** This booklet has at its core, terminology which is aimed at a novice, it has some terminology explained in plain English in brackets (like this) and explanations of core rules and principles (at the end of paragraphs), it has icons and also humorous pictures (to remove the staunchness of legal reading), and at the end it has some court humour excerpts and the lighter side of law, a look at some old, strange and by modern standards, weird laws, if you don’t want to see these when you are reading your legal book, probably best for you not to buy/read this one.

So what’s inside

What is a legal system

What is a crime

The distinction between criminal and civil cases

The burden and standard of proof

Classification of Laws

Substantive Law

Procedural Law

Civil Law

Criminal law

Natural Law

Canon law

The Rule of Law

Common law compared to Civil law

Common Law Civil Law

Pre Common Law in Ireland

Brehon Law

Sources of law in Ireland

European Community Law

The Doctrine of Supremacy

The European Community Treaties

Regulations Directives

The EC institutions

The Organs of the EC

The Irish Constitution

Fundamental personal rights guaranteed under the Irish constitution

Common Law

Acts of the Oireachtas or Legislation

Primary Legislation

Delegated Secondary legislation

Associated Statutory Instruments

The Rule of Law

The Separation of Powers

The Attorney General

The Organs of State

The President

The Executive

The Legislative

The Judiciary

Judicial Independence

The legislative process in Ireland

Statutory Interpretation

Aids to Interpretation

Intrinsic aids Extrinsic aids

Interpretation Acts

The Law of Equity

Equitable Remedies

An Introduction to the Irish Court System

The District Court in Ireland

The Small Claims Court

The Circuit Court in Ireland

The High Court in Ireland

Structure of the High Court of Ireland

The Court of Appeal in Ireland

The Supreme Court in Ireland

The lighter side of the law

Multiple Choice Questions

CLICK HERE TO BUY

 

Welcome to the exciting, intriguing and rewarding field of Offender Profiling Have you ever wanted to study Offender Profiling but didn’t know where to start?. Well look no further, our specialised video course has over 49 separate lecturers with over three hours tutoring in this fascinating field of criminology and forensic…

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Author Interview with Cheryl Bauman-Buffone

Pop on over to read Chryl’s interview

Author Interview with Cheryl Bauman-Buffone

What is Criminology?

Criminology examines why people commit crime, these are the pivotal questions in the ongoing debate of how crime should be handled and prevented. It is an area of law that deals with victims of crime, theories explaining illegal and/or deviant behaviour, the social reaction to crime, the effectiveness of anti-crime policies and the broader political terrain of social control.

Areas of expertise of Criminologists(small example)

Anomie, Social Control Theories
Labelling Theory and Critical Criminology
White Collar Crime

What is Forensic Psychology?

(The science of Behaviour)

Forensic Psychology is used within the justice system to assess offenders, identify criminal capacity in young people and to characterise psychopaths. Identify fitness to stand trial and finally they can be used to determine the likelihood of future violence. Can be used to assess the future criminality of offending minors

Areas of expertise of Forensic Psychologists (small sample)

Criminal Responsibility and Psychiatric Defences
Mental Disorder as a Defence
Eyewitness Testimony

What is Criminal Psychology?

Criminal Psychology (The study of criminal minds)

Criminal Psychology is in plain English, the study of why criminals do what they do. In essence, it is the study of the mental processes, motivational patterns, and behaviour of criminals.

Areas of expertise of Criminal Psychologists (small sample)

Offender Profiling
Geographical Profiling
Eye witness testimony

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